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Dodane: 16-01-2017 05:21
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Wikipedia facts - Stołowe Mountains

Stołowe Mountains (Polish: st??w?v?); also known as the Table Mountains (Polish: Góry Stołowe, Czech: Stolové hory, German: Heuscheuergebirge) are a 42-kilometre (26 mi)-long mountain range in Poland and the Czech Republic, part of the Central Sudetes. The range is situated southeast of the Krkonoše Mts. The Polish part of the range is protected as the Stołowe Mountains National Park.1 The highest peak of the range is Szczeliniec Wielki at 919 m (3,015 ft) a.s.l.2345

The range is formed of sandstone and, as the only one in Poland, presents plated structure with sheer mountain ledges.6 Among the tourist attractions there are two massifs: Szczeliniec Wielki on which the labyrinth, and Skalniak on which the labyrinth Błędne Skały (Errant Rocks). There are several notable rock formations, among them Kwoka ("Hen"), Wielbłąd ("Camel"), Małpa ("Monkey"), Głowa Konia ("Horse Head"), Fotel Pradziada ("Great Grandfather's Armchair").

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sto%C5%82owe_Mountains


Facts about The High Tatras

The High Tatras or High Tatra Mountains (Slovak and Czech: Vysoké Tatry, Polish: Tatry Wysokie, Hungarian: Magas -Tátra), are a mountain range along the border of northern Slovakia in the Prešov Region, and southern Poland in the Lesser Poland Voivodeship. They are a range of the Tatra Mountains chain.

The mountain range borders Belianske Tatras to the east, Podtatranská kotlina to the south and Western Tatras to the west. The major part and all the highest peaks of the mountains are situated in Slovakia. The highest peak is Gerlachovský štít, at 2,655 metres (8,711 ft).

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Tatras


About - Czocha Castle

Czocha Castle (German: Tzschocha, Latin: Caychow) is a defensive castle in the Czocha village (Gmina Lesna), in Lubań County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship (southwestern Poland). The castle is located on the Lake Leśnia, near the Kwisa river, in what is now the Polish part of Upper Lusatia. Czocha castle was built on gneiss rock, and its oldest part is the keep, to which housing structures were later added.

Czocha Castle began as a stronghold, on the Czech-Lusatian border. Its construction was ordered by Wenceslaus I of Bohemia, in the middle of the 13th century (1241?1247). In 1253 castle was handed over to Konrad von Wallhausen, Bishop of Meissen. In 1319 the complex became part of the dukedom of Henry I of Jawor, and after his death, it was taken over by another Silesian prince, Bolko II the Small, and his wife Agnieszka (see Duchy of Silesia). Origin of the stone castle dates back to 1329.

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czocha_Castle